Confessions of a Verbivore

January 21, 2014

Bill Gates predicts there will be almost no poor countries by 2035

Filed under: Verbivore — jargontalk @ 7:40 am

jargontalk:

“We hear these myths raised at international conferences and at social gatherings. We get asked about them by politicians, reporters, students, and CEOs. All three reflect a dim view of the future, one that says the world isn’t improving but staying poor and sick, and getting overcrowded. We’re going to make the opposite case, that the world is getting better, and that in two decades it will be better still.”

Originally posted on Quartz:

In their foundation’s just-released annual letter, Bill and Melinda Gates attempt to debunk three pervasive myths in development economics:

  1. “Poor countries are doomed to stay poor.”
  2. “Foreign aid is a big waste.”
  3. “Saving lives leads to overpopulation.”

From the letter’s introduction:

We hear these myths raised at international conferences and at social gatherings. We get asked about them by politicians, reporters, students, and CEOs. All three reflect a dim view of the future, one that says the world isn’t improving but staying poor and sick, and getting overcrowded.

We’re going to make the opposite case, that the world is getting better, and that in two decades it will be better still.

When it comes to poor countries’ prospects for escaping poverty, Bill Gates, who wrote the section addressing the first myth, is particularly optimistic:

By 2035, there will be almost no poor countries left in the world. Almost all countries…

View original 355 more words

About these ads

1 Comment »

  1. Now reading: 3 Myths That Block Progress For The Poor by Bill and Melinda Gates. A pdf of this is also available here…

    http://t.co/NQK8AeKo26

    Comment by jargontalk — January 21, 2014 @ 8:30 am | Reply


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

The Rubric Theme. Blog at WordPress.com.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 30 other followers

%d bloggers like this: